Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Women's History Month Birthdays: Anna Sewell lived just long enough to see Black Beauty become a classic

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Anna Sewell (1820-1878)
Author

Anna Sewell, who labored against illness to complete her only book, a then-unique “animal autobiography” called Black Beauty, lived five months after it was published in 1877. That was long enough to see its success, and the woman whose aim was “to induce kindness, sympathy, and an understanding of animals” into a world that veered between idolizing and exploiting them died knowing she had realized her goal.

Born to a Quaker family, Sewell’s mother was a successful writer of children’s books promoting moral uplift and good behavior. At fourteen, a slip-and-fall accident left both her ankles seriously damaged; years of medical mistreatment followed, leaving her unable to stand or walk for long without crutches. She got about mostly in a horse-drawn cart, and the experience quickened her sympathies for the animals upon whom she depended.

Sewell and her mother converted to the Church of England, but retained an evangelical slant in their practice and her mother’s books, and Sewell- who acted as an in-house editor and trial audience, was able to work her interest in animal welfare into the books. By 1871, when she became largely bedridden, she began working through the idea she’d worked over in her mind- a novel told from the point of view of a once-proud showhorse reduced to hard times and poor treatment through a succession of owners.

Sewell wrote the book in bed, and, as her strength faded, took to writing short portions on slips her mother transcribed. At the end she was reduced to dictating the last chapters.

A pirated American edition sold a million copies in two years; animal rights campaigners handed out copies to liveries, cabbies and haulers. The book is widely credited with discrediting the practice of polling horses’ tails, and the use of the chokerein, a bit that forced the horses’ necks into a stiff, upright and painful position that was all the fashion among the Victorian well-to-do.

Though intended as an adult work, Black Beauty found its niche as a children’s classic, and has never been out of print. One estimate is that the book has sold over fifty million copies.


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Women's History Month Titles: Inside Anne Frank's House (1st ed. 2004)


From The Writer’s Almanac:

It was on this day in 1944 that Anne Frank (books by this author) made the decision to rewrite her diary as an autobiography. Almost two years earlier, in June of 1942, Anne's parents had given her a red-and-white-checkered diary as a 13th birthday present. A few weeks later, Anne's sister, Margot, received a notice to report for a forced labor camp. The next day, the family went into hiding, moving into rooms above the business office of Otto Frank, Anne's father. Otto's business partner came too, along with his wife and son, as did a dentist. From the beginning, Anne recorded her daily thoughts and feelings in her diary, which she nicknamed "Kitty." Once she filled the original checkered Kitty, she wrote in a black-covered exercise book, given to her by the non-Jewish friends who also took food and supplies to the families in hiding.

On March 28, 1944, the group who lived in hiding together gathered around a contraband radio to hear the news broadcast from London by the Dutch Government in Exile. The Education Minister, Gerrit Bolkestein, encouraged ordinary Dutch citizens living under the Nazi occupation to preserve documents for future generations. He said: "If our descendants are to understand fully what we as a nation have had to endure and overcome during these years, then what we really need are ordinary documents — a diary, letters from a worker in Germany, a collection of sermons given by a parson or priest. Not until we succeed in bringing together vast quantities of this simple, everyday material will the picture of our struggle for freedom be painted in its full depth and glory."

The next day, Anne wrote in her diary, describing Bolkestein's speech. She wrote: "Of course, they all made a rush at my diary immediately. Just imagine how interesting it would be if I were to publish a romance of the 'Secret Annex,' the title alone would be enough to make people think it was a detective story. But, seriously, it would be quite funny 10 years after the war if people were told how we Jews lived and what we ate and talked about here."

Frank went back through two years of entries and painstakingly rewrote them. She assigned pseudonyms to her family and the other members of the Secret Annex, and she edited for clarity, character development, and background. She decided that after the war, she would write a memoir called Het Achterhuis, which translates as "the house behind," or "the annex." She would use the diary as its basis. She wrote: "I know that I can write, a couple of my stories are good, my descriptions of the 'Secret Annex' are humorous, there's a lot in my diary that speaks, but whether I have real talent remains to be seen." She wrote again and again about her desire to become a published writer — a journalist or novelist — and questioned whether she would succeed. At one point she wrote:

Everything here is so mixed up, nothing's connected any more, and sometimes I very much doubt whether anyone in the future will be interested in all my tosh. 'The unbosomings of an ugly duckling' will be the title of all this nonsense.

Even while she rewrote her original diary, Anne continued to add to it, now with an audience in mind. In the spring and summer of 1944, she filled more than 300 pages of loose paper with this revised work. She was still working on it when the Nazis raided the secret annex in August of 1944, acting on an anonymous tip, and sent all of the inhabitants to concentration camps. Anne died of typhus in Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in 1945; of the eight members of the secret annex, only Anne's father, Otto Frank, survived.

Miep Gies was one of the Franks' friends who had helped them during their years of hiding — she and her husband were active in the Dutch resistance. After the annex was raided, Gies found Anne's writing and kept it in her desk, hoping to return it to Anne herself. When she learned that Anne had died, she passed it on to Otto, who edited and eventually published his daughter's story.

Henry Bemis Books celebrates the life of Anne Frank with this remarkable book:



Westra, Hans, Inside Anne Frank’s House: An Illustrated Journey Through Anne’s World (Overlook Duckworth, 1st ed., 2004). ISBN 1-58567-628-4. An elegant history of the Frank family’s hidden home. Lavishly illustrated with contemporary and modern photos. Folio, 266 pp. Hardcover, unclipped dust jacket. Very good condition. HBB price: $50 or best offer.

Henry Bemis Books is one man’s attempt to bring more diversity and quality to a Charlotte-Mecklenburg market of devoted readers starved for choices. Our website is at www.henrybemisbookseller.blogspot.com. Henry Bemis Books is also happy to entertain reasonable offers on items in inventory; for pricing on this or others items, kindly private message us. Shipping is always free; local buyers are welcome to drop by and pick up their purchases at our location off Peachtree Road in Northwest Charlotte if they like.

What’s your favorite social media outlet? We’re blogging at www.henrybemisbookseller.blogspot. com. We tweet as Henry Bemis Books. Have you liked us on Facebook yet? Henry Bemis Books is there, too. And Google+!

#AnneFrank #WomensHistoryMonth #FirstEditions #HenryBemisBooks #Charlotte

Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Women's History Month Titles: Sarah Blake's gripping transatlantic tale of the start of World War II, autographed


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Blake, Sarah, The Postmistress (Berkley, 1st trade paperback ed., 1st printing, February 2011). ISBN 978-0-425-23869-1. Novel of the interwoven tales of a small-town, Massachusetts coastal postmistress and a woman broadcasting war news from London in 1940. Very good condition; autographed on the title page. HBB price: $19.95.



In a 2010 New York Times review, Janet Maslin compared The Postmistress favorably to another recent hit novel, The Help. Summing up Blake’s sophomore novel, Maslin writes,

But the real strength of “The Postmistress” lies in its ability to strip away readers’ defenses against stories of wartime uncertainty and infuse that chaos with wrenching immediacy and terror. Ms. Blake writes powerfully about the fragility of life and about Frankie’s efforts to explain how a person can be present in one instant and then in the next, gone forever. Frankie grasps this when she watches two lovers kiss and thinks about the air that separates their bodies. It’s the same air, she realizes, that carries her own voice overseas. It’s the air between the gunners and their falling bombs. It’s because of that air, she thinks, that the world has become “a great whispering gallery for us all.”

Since all the heroines of “The Postmistress” are American, this isn’t a war story that features a Deborah Kerr role. It just feels like one. The nobility on Ms. Blake’s pages triumphs over the fear, which is one explanation of why this book will click in a major way. Another is that Ms. Blake knows how to deliver tragic turns of fate with maximum impact. When Frankie decides to intervene in the lives of other characters, for instance, she believes that she is being helpful. But Ms. Blake makes her terribly wrong about that. “She was the scissors,” the book says hauntingly at one such juncture. “And she had thought she was the thread.”

This is the sort of book that makes a good introduction to book collecting for a young person you may know. A well-wrought, suspenseful tale in an affordable edition, and autographed!

Henry Bemis Books is one man’s attempt to bring more diversity and quality to a Charlotte-Mecklenburg market of devoted readers starved for choices. Our website is at www.henrybemisbookseller.blogspot.com. Henry Bemis Books is also happy to entertain reasonable offers on items in inventory; for pricing on this or others items, kindly private message us. Shipping is always free; local buyers are welcome to drop by and pick up their purchases at our location off Peachtree Road in Northwest Charlotte if they like.

What’s your favorite social media outlet? We’re blogging at www.henrybemisbookseller.blogspot. com. We tweet as Henry Bemis Books. Have you liked us on Facebook yet? Henry Bemis Books is there, too. And Google+!

#SarahBlake #ThePostmistress #Autographs #FirstEditions #HenryBemisBooks #Charlotte

Monday, March 27, 2017

Women's History Month Titles: From the Winter Palace to Wofford

Gagarine, Marie, From Stolnoy to Spartanburg: The two worlds of a former Russian princess (Sandlapper Press, 1st ed., 1971). ISBN 0-87844-001-1. In her eighties, Marie Gagnarine (1887-1982) composed these memoirs of growing up the granddaughter of the Czarina Alexandra’s “states-lady”: a sort of chief of staff- whose family lost all in the whirlwind of the Revolution and ended up on the faculty of Wofford College in South Carolina.

Includes an account of life at court with the last of the Romanovs. Hardcover, no dust jacket, very good condition. Affectionately inscribed by the author on the front papers. Octavo, 138 pp. Quite Rare. HBB price: $75 obo.
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Henry Bemis Books is one man’s attempt to bring more diversity and quality to a Charlotte-Mecklenburg market of devoted readers starved for choices. Our website is at www.henrybemisbookseller.blogspot.com. Henry Bemis Books is also happy to entertain reasonable offers on items in inventory; for pricing on this or others items, kindly private message us. Shipping is always free; local buyers are welcome to drop by and pick up their purchases at our location off Peachtree Road in Northwest Charlotte if they like.

What’s your favorite social media outlet? We’re blogging at www.henrybemisbookseller.blogspot. com. We tweet as Henry Bemis Books. Have you liked us on Facebook yet? Henry Bemis Books is there, too. And Google+!


#MarieGagarine #WoffordCollege #FirstEditions #Autographs #HenryBemisBooks #Charlotte

It's the birthday of the birthday song lady.

The Writer's Almanac:

Campane di Ravello was commissioned by the Chicago Symphony for conductor Sir Georg Solti's 75th birthday in 1987. Have a listen...
It’s the birthday of the woman who wrote “Happy Birthday to You,” Patty Smith Hill, born in Anchorage, Kentucky (1868). Most of her life was spent as a kindergarten teacher. She began teaching in Louisville, Kentucky, and it was there, in 1893, that Hill first wrote the lyrics to the song. But it was originally meant as a welcome to start the school day and was first called “Good Morning to All.” Hill’s sister Mildred, an accomplished musician, provided the melody. Hill was 25 when she wrote the lyrics to the famous song. 
It became popularized with the invention of radio and sound films. The song appeared in the Broadway musical “The Band Wagon” (1931), and was used for Western Union’s first singing telegram in 1933. A third sister, Jessica Hill, noticed the similarities between “Happy Birthday to You” and the song her sisters wrote, and it was officially copyrighted in 1935. The song produced about $2 million in licensing revenue for years. Then in 2015, federal judge George H. King ruled that that the copyright claim under Warner Music Group was invalid, and “Happy Birthday to You” became part of the public domain—available for anyone to use without being fined.

Sunday, March 26, 2017

Women's History Month Birthday Titles: Erica Jong is 75.

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Erica Jong is 75 years old today. Her first novel, Fear of Flying (1973) became a feminist anthem and sold twenty million copies; twenty-five more books have followed.

Across her fiction, nonfiction and poetry, Jong has conducted a half-century autopsy-in-progress on her own life. Her first three marriages were the subjects of books (when you marry your college sweetheart, a Chinese-American psychologist, and a novelist son of a novelist, how could one not? BTW, her fourth, since 1989, is a lawyer).

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Our birthday book of the day, Jong’s Seducing the Demon: Writing for My Life (2006), is another installment of memoir-to-date.

Kirkus Reviews called the book “a zesty, savvy, freewheeling memoir of the writing life, portions of which first appeared in the New York Times Book Review and The Writer magazine.

“Readers expecting gutsy writing from the author of Fear of Flying (1973) will not be disappointed. Jong vows to tell the truth about herself: her mistakes, her regrets, her divorces, her lawsuits. As she explains it, even the most uncomfortable things she did, she did knowing that she would write about them. She is candid about her addiction to alcohol and her rehab efforts, the time she passed out next to Robert Redford at a dinner party, her night in a Beverly Hills jail for drunk driving and, of course, her sexual encounters. ‘I kill my enemies with words,’ she writes, and her rebuttal of Martha Stewart’s claim that Jong ruined her marriage is a demonstration of that skill.

Henry Bemis Books has a first edition, first printing, inscribed to the recipient, “I know prisons now, see page 244-”

Henry’s autographed first edition is available at $75 or best offer.

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Henry Bemis Books also has one of her mid-career titles in a very nice first edition:

Jong, Erica, Any Woman’s Blues (Harper & Row, stated 1st ed., 1st printing, 1990). ISBN 0-06-016272-4. A festival of emotional codependency and addictive behavior as only the author of Fear of Flying can tell it. Hardcover, unclipped dust jacket showing a bit of wear at the edges, very good condition.

Henry’s price: $35 or best offer.
__________________________
Henry Bemis Books is one man’s attempt to bring more diversity and quality to a Charlotte-Mecklenburg market of devoted readers starved for choices. Our website is at www.henrybemisbookseller.blogspot.com.  Henry Bemis Books is also happy to entertain reasonable offers on items in inventory; for pricing on this or others items, kindly private message us. Shipping is always free; local buyers are welcome to drop by and pick up their purchases at our location off Peachtree Road in Northwest Charlotte if they like. #Erica Jong #LiteraryBirthdays #Book of the Day #RareBooks #HenryBemisBooks #Charlotte

What’s your favorite social media outlet?

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And Google+.

Birthday: The unassailable Fortress Housman



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Alfred Edward Housman (1869-1936)
Poet, classical scholar

He published only two collections of verse, and never spoke about poetry in public until he gave a lecture on the art of poetry at the age of seventy-four. He built an impregnable fortress of respectability and bristling erudition to protect a passionate nature whose overt expression risked imprisonment in his day. He was one of the most popular poets in the English language for three-quarters of a century, and his work as a classical scholar remains the definitive word on the works of the Roman poets Juvenal, Lucan and Manilius.

Housman was the oldest of seven children of a country lawyer who didn’t have to work very hard at it; he preferred the life of the genial country squire. His was not the usual, Bible, booze and beatings personality stereotypical of the age, and the family lived, by all accounts, a remarkably happy and uneventful life.

When Housman was twelve, however, his mother died suddenly and as is the way for eldest sons in that circumstance, he was obliged to shoulder much of the daily management of his younger siblings. The job comes unsought and without training, only criticism after the fact of every decision taken. One’s brothers and sisters can become natural enemies, chafing under the rule of an unqualified interloper and full-time killjoy. He emerged a serious young man, a piece of his youth lost.

He escaped to boarding school, then won a scholarship to St John’s College, Oxford: the richest in the university, and staffed by some of the most renowned classics scholars of the day. Despite an already bristling erudition and personal reserve, he got on well with his few close friends and distinguished himself in the textual criticism side of his studies. He thought classical history and philosophy useless ornaments, and neglected their study; as a result, he left without a degree. He later recalled, “Oxford had not much effect on me, except that I met my greatest friend.”

That friend, his St John’s roommate, Moses Jackson, got a job at the Patent Office in London and got Housman a place there after him. Housman, Jackson, and Jackson’s brother shared a flat in London for a number of years, until Housman summoned the nerve to confess the feelings he’d suppressed since Oxford. It was a typical, unrequired pairing of opposites: Housman the introvert scholar his schoolmates had dubbed “Mouse,” and Jackson, a science student and university first VIII oarsman.

Jackson let Housman down fairly gently but left Britain in 1867 to become head of a school in India. He came back to England once, in 1889, to marry. Housman was not invited and only learned of the wedding in the newspaper. They never saw each other again.

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During his decade at the patent office, Housman spent his spare time at the British Museum, researching a long and imposing set of scholarly articles on Greek and Roman classicists. At thirty-three, University College London offered him its professorship of Latin. His work had so overwhelmed his poor academic record there was virtually no one his equal to be found.

He spent nineteen years in the post, stacking up more monumental articles while, in his off time, writing pessimistic poetry about an imagined, pastoral English countryside and its people. It was sad, nostalgic verse; death offered no solace. After a number of publishers rejected the book, he published it privately. It found an audience in the educated classes, suffused as they were in Victorian self-repression and a fin-de-siecle sense of foreboding that the old order was passing into an uncertain, degraded future. Composers found the lyric voice in the collection- A Shropshire Lad, Housman titled it- enchanting, and dozens set his words to music. It was pitch-perfect. No one knew Housman had never been to Shropshire until he decided to use it as a framework for what he had to say.

Houseman wrote several layers deep in his poems. To get the full message presupposed a thorough grounding in the classics; in 2001 Anthony Lane wrote in The Yorker that “the ideal Housman reader would have the Authorized Version of the Bible, especially the Book of Isaiah, the Psalms, and Ecclesiastes, at his or her fingertips, plus a heavy grounding in Milton and, for good measure, all of Horace and Heine.”

Not only did Houseman’s depth of field mark him as a poet worthy of his scholarly standing; it allowed him to write, in plain sight, what could not be said. In an era of gender segregation, reminiscences of male friendships, had and lost, rang true with readers looking back through the lens of nostalgia without a sense of scandal. The erudite reader knew how to lift the invisible ink from the page.

Indeed, A Shropshire Lad came out just after Oscar Wilde’s trials; as Oscar Wilde sat in jail, denied reading material; his friend Robbie Ross memorized poems from it to recite to him on visits. They well understood the rage underlying one:

Oh, who is that young sinner with the handcuffs on his wrists?
And what has he been after that they groan and shake their fists?
And wherefore is he wearing such a conscience-stricken air?
Oh, they're taking him to prison for the colour of his hair.

'Tis a shame to human nature, such a head of hair as his;
In the good old time 'twas hanging for the colour that it is;
Though hanging isn't bad enough and flaying would be fair
For the nameless and abominable colour of his hair.

Tis a shame to human nature, such a head of hair as his;
In the good old time 'twas hanging for the colour that it is;
Though hanging isn't bad enough and flaying would be fair
For the nameless and abominable colour of his hair.

Oh a deal of pains he's taken and a pretty price he's paid
To hide his poll or dye it of a mentionable shade;
But they've pulled the beggar's hat off for the world to see and stare,
And they're haling him to justice for the colour of his hair.

Now 'tis oakum for his fingers and the treadmill for his feet
And the quarry-gang on Portland in the cold and in the heat,
And between his spells of labour in the time he has to spare
He can curse the God that made him for the colour of his hair.

(In this post-poetry age, it is hard to imagine the role verse- reading, memorizing, reciting- had in the pre-World War II ages. The young writer E.M. Forster was so enchanted by A Shropshire Lad he went on a walking tour, visiting place name after place name in the book before realizing, reading some poems one night, the code: “the poet had fallen in love with another man.” He sent Housman a fan letter, only to get no reply. Only much later did he learn he had failed to give a return address.)

Housman moved up again in 1911, this time to the chair of Latin at Trinity College, Cambridge. He spent the rest of his life there, cultivating the eccentricities, feints and diversions inside which he lived. In one of his public lectures he explained his method without actually explaining:

“One lifetime, nine lifetimes are not long enough for the task of blocking every cranny through which calamity may enter. . . . A life spent, however victoriously, in securing the necessaries of life is no more than an elaborate furnishing and decoration of apartments for the reception of a guest who is never to come. Our business here is not to live, but to live happily.”

If emotionally stunted- one colleague said Housman was descended from a long line of maiden aunts- he was not, on the face of it, un-happy. He was a boon companion to the children of friends on seaside holidays. He cultivated a fearsome palate and reputation as a gastronome, once tucking into a hedgehog for the experience. Frank Kermode wrote,

[W]hether or not he was unhappy he was capable of describing the state of man as one of just tolerable discomfort; and of claiming that there were ways of relieving even that degree of misery. He would tour Europe in a chauffeur-driven hired car and fly to France on the fledgling air services, claiming to conquer his fears by reflecting that every crash reported reduced the probability of his being involved in one himself. He invariably celebrated the New Year with a feast of oysters and stout. On hospitable London evenings he liked to entertain his guests at the Café Royal before taking them to a music hall.

Housman loved American humor and adored the comic actress Anita Loos. He was delighted by a 1927 visit from Clarence Darrow, who told him how “he’d often used my poetry to rescue his clients from the electric chair.” He translated Latin obscenities in the  elegant facetiousness of his conversation, and on trips to France, indulged a taste for Continental literature the Lord Chamberlain's Office declared had called obscene.

Life in the closet inevitably needs a pressure valve. Anthony Lane described it:

It was back in his study, though, that Housman was most roused to action. This was of little concern to the world beyond, but it was highly disturbing if your name happened to be Owen, an editor of Persius and Juvenal: “Mr. Owen's innovations, so far as I can see, have only one merit, which certainly, in view of their character, is a merit of some magnitude: they are few.” Or poor Dr. Postgate, an editor of Phaedrus: “Dr Postgate's notes on I 19 7, 28 5, IV 9 5, 17 8 and 10, 18 14, 20 15, V 5 1, app. 13 25, 14 10, 15 10, appear to have been written before he knew what his text was going to be, or after he had forgotten what it was.” Not even those who typeset a new edition of Martial are spared the rod: “The printers have indulged immoderately in their favourite sport of dropping letters on the floor and then leaving them to lie there or else putting them back in wrong places; and at the top of p. 113 of the text their merriment transgresses the bounds of decorum.” In the event that you ever come across the three volumes of Housman's “Classical Papers” in a secondhand bookstore, grab them; even if you don't have a word of Latin or Greek (and Housman convinces you that it is better to have no words than to have the wrong ones), his sense of passionate glee, as he strops his intellectual knives for the purposes of ritual disembowelment, offers the reader as unflagging a demonstration of native wit as can be found in English since the reign of Sydney Smith. Housman has none of Smith's tolerance or Christian benignity, but this is the arena of pure scholarship, where slackness is a sin beyond purgation.

He terrified and intimidated students, bringing many to tears; he took no interest in remembering their names and ridiculed their translation exercises.

“He declined all academic and national honours because to accept them would be to admit comparability with other classical scholars who had received them, admiring the attitude of the 17th-century Greek scholar Thomas Gataker who refused a Cambridge doctorate because ‘like Cato the censor he would rather have people ask why he had no statue than why he had one.’ When he came across some self-critical words of T.E. Lawrence in Seven Pillars of Wisdom – ‘there was a craving to be famous; and a horror of being known to like being known’ – he wrote in the margin: ‘This is me.’ So in the course of his life he turned down everything from the OM to the poet laureateship, not to speak of many honorary doctorates. And he refused all invitations to give lectures except for the ones that he conceived to be part of his job,” Kermode wrote. Anthony Lane thought it a typically Housmanian evasion, designed to make him seem “both lofty and lowly.”

He could be a terror to his colleagues, denying Wittgenstein, who had adjoining, but less grand, rooms at Trinity, access to his private loo, because.

After World War I Housman pulled together another collection of poetry from the Edwardian and Great War days, intending a gift of sort for Moses Jackson, who was retired in Canada and dying. Last Poems came out in 1922, and to Housman’s way of thinking, they were.  His five-volume study of the Roman poet-astronomer Manilius, begun in 1903, he completed in 1930. He unburdened himself, ever so slightly, in his 1933 Leslie Stephen Lecture on poetry, and died, after a period of failing health, in 1936.

His brother oversaw the publication of several posthumous volumes. An essay on friendship- rather like Forster's novel Maurice- was sealed until 1967.

More Poems (1936) contains one in which Housman imagined Moses Jackson passing his grave, everyone keeping the stiffest of upper lips:

Because I liked you better
Than suits a man to say,
It irked you, and I promised
To throw the thought away.
To put the world between us
We parted, stiff and dry;
‘Good-bye,’ said you, ‘forget me.’
‘I will, no fear’, said I.
If here, where clover whitens
The dead man’s knoll, you pass,
And no tall flower to meet you
Starts in the trefoiled grass,
Halt by the headstone naming
The heart no longer stirred,
And say the lad that loved you
Was one that kept his word.

Housman’s reputation followed a long, slowly declining trajectory through the rest of the twentieth century. Because his life was so conventional, and his verse so carefully wrought to achieve the veneer of plainspokenness, he had gone out of favor in the new century. As the gay tribe claimed its place in the public square, Houseman seemed not only square but cowardly. Auden mocked him:

Deliberately he chose the dry-as-dust,
Kept tears like dirty postcards in a drawer …
In savage footnotes on unjust editions
He timidly attacked the life he led.

Modernist poetry swept away much of the former regard for writing within the artificial disciplines of form; new modes of entertainment removed the audience for poetry across the board. Housman has begun to emerge again, championed by authors like Alan Hollinghurst, for what he managed to say, in the constraints not just of verse, but his time, speaking at once to the universal, and the particular, in his verse. Reading Housman after knowing his life is like reading a Cole Porter after learning he was gay: the same words, but different.

Shake hands, we shall never be friends, all's over;
I only vex you the more I try.
All's wrong that ever I've done or said,
And nought to help it in this dull head:
Shake hands, here's luck, good-bye.
But if you come to a road where danger
Or guilt or anguish or shame's to share,
Be good to the lad that loves you true
And the soul that was born to die for you,
And whistle and I'll be there.


#LiteraryBirthdays #AEHousman #HenryBemisBooks  #Charlotte
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